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Welcome to Musings – The Loom Room Blog

29 January, 2017

The Loom Room move to France

Filed under: Life,Travel — Tags: , , — admin @ 6:52 pm

Every day is a really exciting day at the moment!

Each day my workshop becomes a little more like a weaving workshop.

But it didn’t start out that way!

Our main move was on 4/5 January.  All was going swimmingly.  We had managed to pack the van (a transit) really well and had enjoyed a calm crossing overnight from Portsmouth to Caen.  We had even managed to fit in a visit to relatives about 2 hours into the journey.  3 hours later we had resumed and got just 1 hour away from our new home when

ZUT ALORS

Mega-smoke out of the exhaust and sudden loss of power!  It would have been alarming enough if I hadn’t been overtaking two lorries at the time!  OK, so it was a little foggy, but lorry headlights shouldn’t just disappear behind a smoke screen, should they??!!

We limped on the hard shoulder and put our hazard lights on and I continued to drive very slowly to get off at the next junction which, fortunately, was only 5kms away.  Oh, and just to make things a little more interesting, it was the coldest night in France this winter up to that point!

I have to raise my hat to Green Flag.  We phoned them and explained the situation and they sent someone out within 45 mins and he even brought a tow-truck with him to take us to his depot.  We had to leave the transit there overnight, and the rescue man agreed to take us the hour home.  So far so good.

We hadn’t got very far before his new car started showing a red engine warning light!  So we pulled over, stopped the vehicle, waited a few moments and started again.  The engine light went out.  Great!  Just 5 mins later on it came again.  This happened a few more times, and our driver decided that it was too risky to go further, so back we went to change vehicles.

Finally we were on our way again with a car that didn’t show any red warning lights, thankfully!  We were relaxing into the drive and pleased to be on the way home when suddenly, a fully-grown deer started out from the verge right in front of the car!  And we weren’t going slowly!!

What can I say?  The car had very good brakes, and somehow our driver managed not to hit the deer – a good result for all of us!!

We were on full alert after that, I can tell you!

We eventually arrived at our destination about 12.30am – after initially hoping to arrive at 7.30pm!!  But we were safe and sound, even if our transit was a little sick.  It finally arrived back with us three days later, just in time for us to off-load my workshop stairs so that our friend could fit them.  He was coming from the UK specifically to fit them.  It would have been a little awkward if they hadn’t been there!

The transit is unfortunately not well enough to go anywhere now!  The engine is ok, but the turbo is so expensive to repair that we are hoping to sell it to someone who is able to repair it themselves!  We now have a little Renault Kangoo – not the most elegant of vehicles, but very useful for bags and cases for when my students need picking up from the airport.

Things are happening fast now, so I’ll be able to post more news and photos during the next few days!!

In the meantime, Happy Weaving!!

 

 

 

22 December, 2016

Countdown to……. A New Life

Filed under: Life,Travel — admin @ 10:20 am

Have you noticed how many people now countdown days/sleeps before an event?

It seems to be a marketing phenomena that has caught on with the general public.  Generally I can’t stand the idea of people wishing away their lives through counting down one more day until Xmas, or Easter, or a holiday.  Children have always counted down days to a party or a friend coming to stay, or Christmas and their presents, but adults seem to be doing it all the time now – on the tv and radio presenters are always saying ‘One more day closer to the weekend’ – ‘just one more day until the weekend begins’ – ‘ten more sleeps before Xmas’ etc.  It drives me nuts!

But….

This year has been a year of events for us.  Moving from our house to a temporary house.  So many ferries to catch to take (mostly) weaving stuff to France.  Builders coming to do work on the French house.  More ferries to and from France.  An exhibition in Holland.  Xmas with our family and ensuring that all the redirections are done.  Another ferry trip to France.  And maybe two or three more to pick up the final bits and bobs – and baby jacquard looms – in the New Year.

I confess I have been counting down the days to various key points, in an effort not to lose track of where I should be at what time, in which country, at which port, with what stuff!!  I have managed to leave keys behind in France for the UK, miss one ferry by 24 hours, and forget my essential tool box for the exhibition in Holland!

I started off the year knowing where all my yarns were in storage – which box/which building – and am ending the year not knowing where anything is as it has all been moved around so much in packing vans, repacking the storage to fit more furniture in, etc.

In other words, my life has become infinitely more complicated!  And in trying to keep up with everything that is going on, I have found myself falling into countdowns.  Two weeks to go before I need to be there, with that, ready for the other!!  One week to organise this before we have to travel…  Two weeks in France with the plumber coming on Monday for 3 days, the builder on Tuesday for 1 day, the electrician hopefully on Wednesday, and not sure for how long, and we have to leave next week…..  One month before the exhibition …. yikes, three days before I have to leave for the exhibition – but what is in France and what is in England?  Which pieces am I taking?  Where are they?  Where are my tool boxes?  Did they come in the last vanload, or are some tools still in England – and are they in storage or our temporary accommodation?  Are my artworks in temporary studio 3 or 4 in France, or in England?  Oh boy!!

It’s no surprise that countdowns, and lists, can help in these situations.  If you know how long you have got to do something, you can work backwards to find out exactly what you need to do and when in order to complete everything you need to do/organise/pack.

For us, the end is nearly in sight.  We move at the beginning of January to start our new life.  We will still have a few things to come back and collect but we will be based in France.  Countdowns have been helping, but I must confess that I am looking forward to a life without countdowns, where I can get back to living each day mindfully, from the moment of waking until the moment of sleeping, enjoying each day for what it brings, rather than panicking to fit everything in, living with lists all around me and boxes of half-packed belongings wherever I look.

And I am looking forward to being able to settle down, breathe calmly, and start unpacking my life and hopefully making it a little bit simpler in the process.

A very happy Christmas to those of you who celebrate it, and a happy holiday season to everyone.

And, of course, Happy Weaving!!!!

 

 

4 November, 2016

Exhibition: ‘Weaving Futures’ London Transport Museum 22/11/2016 – 18/02/2017

Exhibition: ‘Weaving Futures’ | London Transport Museum

Dates: 22 November 2016 to 18 February 2017

‘Weaving Futures’ is an exhibition at London Transport Museum highlighting the importance of woven textile design to the London Transport system. The exhibition explores the process and making of digital woven textiles, as part of the Museums’, Designology season.

Each week, visitors will be able to see invited designers/artists in residence in the Designology studio, who will be working on a project brief and interacting with a weaver. The weavers will be interpreting  the residents  work live  into digital woven textile prototypes and final works on a state-of-the-art TC2 digital jacquard loom.

51977-049‘Weaving Futures’ is  curated by design & research industry experts, Philippa Brock and Samuel Plant Dempsey

The Weaving Futures season will start with Wallace Sewell, who will be in residence in the studio from Nov 22nd – 26th 2016

Other residents participating in the season  include: AssembleBeatwovenPhilippa BrockCamiraCentral Saint Martins, BA Textile studentsSamuel DempseyLinda FlorenceGainsborough Weaving CompanyEleanor PritchardRare Thread : aka Kirsty McDougall & Laura Miles, Josephine OrtegaIsmini SamanidouStudio HoundstoothJo PierceTakram & Priti Veja

Resident artists and designers have been invited to respond to a project brief; exploring the role of textiles in modern transport now and in the future. They will focus on ‘untapped’ sources of data generated by, or helpful to, the transport system. Their responses will then be interpreted into woven textiles, live for museum visitors.

The weavers for the season are Rosie Green & Hanna Vinlöf Nylen

Creative responses may span from future speculations on data capture and its textile use, to new methods of digitising human interactions, to creative interpretations and visualisations of existing TfL data sets.

Design & artistic approaches may include drawing, photography, film, sound, mark-making and model making.

wallace-sewell-overground-weavingThe Weave Shed will highlight each resident each week of the season with images, biographies and contact details.

The Weaving Futures: Data and Transport project brief given to the Designers & Artists explores the significance of Jacquard loom weaving beyond textiles, looking at how the Jacquard loom punch card system led to the development of computers and digital data, and how these have affected transport systems as a whole.

The season will also bring to the fore London’s most loved urban fabric – moquette. Many people who have travelled on the London transport network will be familiar with the patterned seating fabric on Tube trains, buses, DLR, the London Overground and Croydon Tramlink, but they may not know of its rich history as integral to the design of the capitial’s public transport since the 1920s.

Derived from the French word for carpet, moquette is a type of woven pile fabric, in which cut or uncut threads form a short dense cut or loop pile. As well as giving it a distinctive velvet-like feel, the pile construction is particularly durable, and ideally suited to applications such as public transport.
Digital Weaving Norway has sponsored the installation of a TC2 Digital jacquard loom for the duration of the exhibition.

The programme is also supported by CamiraThe Worshipful Company of Weavers and Pointcarré.

Weaving Futures events will take place every week in the Museum’s pop-up Designology Studio from 22 November until 18 February.

All day-time events are drop-in and free to attend with the annual London Transport Museum admission ticket. There is also a Late Debate on the evening of 26 January 2017.

The Designology studio and Late Debate series of events, including Weaving Futures, are part of London Transport Museum and Transport for London’s Transported by Design season which is supported by Exterion Media.

The 18 month programme of events and exhibitions explores good design on the transport network and its role in the lives of the millions of customers who use it each day.

The Weave Shed will cover the exhibition on @weavingfutures twitter and @theweaveshed instagram
@ ltm #designology

wallace-sewell-underground-moquette

Images: Wallace Sewell ( moquettes and loom), Digital weave Norway (image 2)

8 December, 2015

The Power of Dreams

Filed under: Education,Life,Teaching,Travel,Weaving — Tags: , , , , , — admin @ 8:25 pm

It’s amazing to think how a seemingly inconsequential choice can change the whole direction of one’s life, isn’t it?  And yet, so often that is exactly what happens.  And once that initial choice has been made, other decisions compound the effect until suddenly you find yourself looking at a whole new life.  And all it took was a birthday choice!

Nearly five years ago, my husband, Graham, turned 50.  He wanted to celebrate by going on a cookery course abroad.  Italy and France were on the shortlist, and he decided that he didn’t want to cook pasta.  That choice changed our lives!

The Gascony Cookery School is based in a small village on the edge of Tarn-et-Garonne and the Gers, down in the deep south-west of France.  It is set on a rocky outcrop in rolling hills with farmland all around it hosting kilometre on kilometre of sunflower fields in the summer.  Gramont boasts a chateau open to the public, a wonderful auberge (where cookery school students also get to work), and a honey museum.  In one of those quirks of fate, Graham, who should have been one of six students, was the only student.  (Something similar happened to me when I went to study jacquard at the Lisio Foundation in Florence – there should have been five or six of us, but there were only two!)  Over long leisurely meals with our hosts, Dave and Vikki, it transpired that they wanted to produce a honey beer, but didn’t know how.  Graham (my husband) has been brewing his own beer from the grain since I have known him (well over 30 years) and said he could help.  The more we talked, the more we realised our particular (and peculiar) mix of skills would fit in this village.  Graham with his brewing and music (he’s a good ‘cellist), and his wonderful ability to get on with everyone, and me with my weaving.  There was even an empty property for us to look round that would allow us to do all our activities.

We came home from that holiday buzzing with excitement and potentialities.  We went back to have another look in the summer.  The property was daunting – a lot of building work would be needed to make it functional but we had got the bit between our teeth and approached the sellers.

Not a lot happens speedily in the countryside of France, as many Francophiles will tell you.  That’s part of its appeal!  Because there was so much structural work to undertake before even starting work on making the property functional, we put forward a price which was not accepted.  We hoped that time would encourage the sellers to reconsider.  We went back to Gramont several times.  Then all went quiet from the sellers.

We went back this April, still set on the same property, but this time we decided to see what else was out there.  What other properties in the area would allow us to do our thing or give us a comparison to be able to negotiate a better price?  We viewed 15 properties in one week, and I have to say that the estate agents were all amazing!  Then it happened.  The very last house we looked at just took our breath away.  As we drove up the drive, I said to Graham ‘This is it!’  We felt exactly what we had felt when we first set eyes on Willowgate 23 years ago.  And as we walked round, it felt more and more like home without all the back-breaking work that would have been entailed in the property in Gramont and only 40 minutes away from Gramont.

La Tuilerie with studio

We hummed and hawed for a short while after we got home but that was just nerves.  We had really already made our decision, and in May our offer was accepted.  Just two days later, another offer was put in but the sellers of La Tuilerie honoured their word to us.  And now, finally, at the end of November 2015, we are the proud owners of a beautiful maison de maitre with attached barn for my weaving studio and teaching studio, a workshop for Graham’s micro-brewery, and a small shop to sell our wares!  We will be able to put guests up and offer the kind of immersive experience that we enjoyed at the cookery school, where I can teach weaving and intersperse it with trips to local markets, restaurants, local beauty spots and places of interest so that students and guests can enjoy the tastes and sights of Gascony.

And all because of a birthday decision!!

It will take a while to renovate the buildings to allow us to run the weaving courses and the B&B, but this is the start of a new life.  Graham is taking the plunge and leaving teaching which he has done for 30 years, to devote himself to looking after my guests and brewing his beer.  Of course it will be a challenge – not least the language side of things – and we are not taking it lightly, but there are so many people who are looking out for us and encouraging and helping us, both in the UK and in France, that with a lot of hard work and patience I think we will settle in to a new way of life and really be part of the local community in Nérac and Condom.

I do hope we will have the opportunity to host some of you, my past students, dear weaving friends and fellow explorers on life’s rich path.  I will post updates on FB and here and in my occasional newsletters, but in the meantime,

May All Your Dreams Come True!!  (Because they sometimes do!! :^))

 

9 November, 2014

What weaving means to me

I don’t know about you, but I get sent a number of requests from students asking for me to complete questionnaires for their dissertation research.  Some of them are not thought through and in that case I reply tactfully that they need to do a bit of basic research themselves before sending out questionnaires willynilly.  But this week I have had one that gave me pause for thought.

In my own masters research, I read a lot about the importance of tactility in everyday life and art, as that is something I feel passionately about – textiles are for touching for me, although I respect that many ‘art’ pieces are not designed to be handled.  My work is about erosion in all sorts of guises and about tactility and I want people to interact physically with my work.  It’s also a medium that, for the handweaver, insists on physical interaction at different times during the making process.  In every step of creating a warp, I interact with the materials physically, although the planning is all brainwork and 3-dimensional spatial planning inside my head.

The questionnaire I received this week asked me if I find weaving challenging.  This I interpreted two different ways – challenging as in ‘difficult to overcome’, and challenging as in ‘mentally and maybe practically demanding’.  The first meaning isn’t so relevant to me, but the second most definitely so.  If it is not challenging, I am not pushing myself.  Occasionally I do something that doesn’t take too much mental effort but just requires the physical input of weaving – my Xmas cards, for example – but mostly I am challenging myself to develop new ways of doing or learning.  Using the natural world as my inspiration I strive to envisage ways of using weave structures and materials to allow me to interpret geology, growth and erosion patterns from flora, fauna and minerals into textural expressions.  I use all the things I have learnt previously, and play with them, investigating how I can merge ideas or structures to create a different take on something and make something unexpected happen.  Serendipity plays a crucial role but first I have to think things through and move things in a certain direction so that serendipity can have the room to intervene.

Charlotte also asked if weaving is a stressful occupation, and whether it has helped me improve other skills such as problem solving/mathematics/social skills?  Well, yes, occasionally I do get stressed when something goes wrong, but it’s usually if I am in the wrong mind-set anyway, or I feel under pressure from outside forces.  Where I am the person totally in control of things, then I don’t usually get stressed, even when things go wrong.  It takes as long as it takes.  But I know for sure that it has certainly helped me improve problem solving – thinking laterally, seeing what is around me that I can press into service when something physically goes wrong with the loom (happily a fairly rare occurance), being spatially aware of how a flat fabric will shape up into a 3-D piece once it is removed from the loom, thinking in terms of numbers of shafts and patterns when working out what designs to create, and socially, well I get the chance to travel and meet lots of people, sharing with them my technical knowledge, love of weave and my particular way of looking at the world….  All wonderful things to be able to do and share.

I also talked about how weaving can be meditation – getting in the zone allows you to drift away from the pressures of everyday life and focus entirely on the moment, what your body and mind are doing right now, right here.  It has also helped me work out how to approach difficult situations in my emotional life, moral issues raised by a teenage son, and gives me a sense of perspective when things get overblown in my mind.

The questionnaire went on to ask about other aspects of weaving which also required further thought but I stopped for a while to think about just how important these particular questions are to what we do.  We are engaged with our hands, minds, emotions and body, using sight, touch, smell and spatial awareness in the physicality and preparation of weaving.  Yet the act of physically throwing a shuttle allows us to engage analytic thought (if we wish!), but also to focus on the moment, awareness of our bodies, throwing the shuttle and moving the shafts, and also, at the same time, the mental distance from everyday things to allow our subconscious minds to sort out knotty and complex emotional and mental issues whilst we are physically engaged in a rhythmic exercise.

No wonder weave is all-engrossing, and that it continues to be a craft form that gains adherents, devotees, and fanatics (I count myself in the latter group!! ), even more as our daily lives are more and more engaged with digital technology.  The fact that it is found world-wide, and is such an old craft form, is testament to its endurance as an essential craft for our physical but also our mental well-being.

Thank you, Charlotte, for reminding me what weave means to me.

Happy weaving!

1 October, 2014

Technology v Longhand – Either/Or or Both? Reading, writing and weaving

Filed under: Art,Education,Life,Philosophy,Teaching,Travel,Weaving — admin @ 11:15 am

Today I chanced across a post on my Facebook feed.  I don’t usually spend much time on Facebook, but this one article caught my eye and I read further….  http://mic.com/articles/99408/science-has-great-news-for-people-who-read-actual-books

I have always had a reluctance to use e-readers, although I have one.  Wherever possible, I much prefer to pick up a physical book.  I could never put my finger on it, but especially when doing research reading for my masters, I found myself unable to concentrate if reading text on an e-reader.  At the end of the piece, I wouldn’t have understood it and would have to read it again and again.  It frustrated me that I couldn’t turn page corners down to emphasize where I had found an interesting point, although I could highlight text, but finding the text again wasn’t so easy, especially if I was carrying several trains of thought in my head at the same time.

Then, once I had ‘liked’ that article, several others popped up underneath the original one.  This time there were three other links to articles that drew me in. The first one was about writing  ….  http://mic.com/articles/98348/science-shows-writers-have-a-serious-advantage-over-the-rest-of-us

I am a diary girl.  It helps me to keep track of ideas, emotions, events in my currently rollercoaster life, and it also helps me to gain a sense of perspective on my own and others’ actions.  It started a few years ago, proved its value during my masters journey, helped me to keep a memory of places visited on my trips, and now is a way to help me keep track of what I’ve done, upcoming deadlines, and a memory jogger as my own memory is having serious issues!  I know memory is highly subjective anyway, and we only keep a memory of how we view something, and that that memory is subject to change, but I am very aware that my imagination interferes with my memory and I cannot always rely on remembering something accurately.  This is incredibly frustrating and I hate not being able to trust my memory.  So the journal is a vital tool in holding on to my emotions and reflections of events, places and people at the time.  Of course, journals can be manipulated as we write them and most people writing a journal on a computer undo sentences and rewrite.  It is easy to do, and can allow streams of consciousness writing which are then re-written.  In a physical journal, if you don’t want to end up with phrases crossed out, you are required to construct the sentence and therefore the slant in your head prior to committing it to the paper.  I know that my own emotional issues have been helped by writing them out both on paper and in an e-diary.  Curiously, I findthat I tend to get more emotionally involved in my writing if I am writing in a physical diary, and to stay with the emotions longer – not always a good thing.  Writing emotionally on the keyboard is not so immersive and reading back my writing on the laptop has a distancing effect, as if I am reading someone else’s writing.  This can have value, especially if the emotions you are expressing are not positive ones.

The next article seemed to bear out my own thinking  http://www.scientificamerican.com/article/reading-paper-screens/  and led on to another article that seemed to encapsulate my own experience when note-taking in tutorials/lectures at university during my masters….. http://www.scientificamerican.com/article/a-learning-secret-don-t-take-notes-with-a-laptop/

I had done both methods and totally related to mindless typing of verbatim discussions, missing the wood for the trees in a discussion and wondering what had just happened when the session was finished.  After a few ‘typed’ sessions, I reverted to hand-written notes and understood far more from patchier notes.  It also struck me that court recorders might have to disengage with the content of what they are recording in order to distance the mind to focus on the taking down of accurate records.  Theirs has to be verbatim notes but if they actually thought about the content, would their emotions have an impact on their efficiency of record taking?  I’d love to hear from a court recorder about how they work.

This got me thinking about how we learn in weaving.  I am currently studying Marian Stubenitsky’s book ‘Echo & Iris’.  I struggle with learning something new.  As I’ve mentioned in previous posts, it usually takes me about 3 weeks to process a visiting tutor’s weaving workshop.  I just have to stay with the discomfort of not knowing what people are talking about or understanding the fundamentals of a new technique and suddenly it will ‘click’.  When working through a book, I read the information, weave the samples, and then analyse the physical weaving.  When teaching drafting, I do not allow my students to start off with the computer.  Even if they have the weaving software, I encourage them to do the drawdown with pencil and squared paper.  Why?  Because in the slow process of physically drafting by hand, their brains can assimilate the visual knowledge and turn it into comprehension of the relationship of warp and weft.

I’ve just been weaving 8S versions of some of Marian’s samples.  It took me a while to realize that I work better with Bonnie Inouye’s method of tie-up and to change Marian’s tie-ups into a Bonnie-method.  Then suddenly I could see what the two sides were supposed to be doing.  I could then work out how I wanted to adapt the liftplans to give me the results I was looking for.  During the writing of this blog, I have had a sudden ‘click’ moment about how to get the effects I am wanting to achieve but I am going to go back to the software to check if my thinking will actually work before I weave it.  I am able to do that because I know what I am looking for, but if I didn’t, I would go back to drafting longhand to understand the principles before going to the software to develop designs quickly (relatively speaking!).

What am I trying to say here, in my long-winded way?  I think that technology in reading, writing and weaving is very useful, can be time-saving, can also allow for weaving experimentation in a way that old-fashioned drafting precludes by its very ease of use, but that comprehension is required before that experimentation can occur and for me, longhand drafting can aid in that comprehension in a way that technology cannot provide.  It’s very interesting to read (electronically) the four articles looking at how digital reading and writing can impact on our memory and comprehension and to note that it would have been very probable that someone like me would not have had access to this kind of material prior to digital technology.  The dissemination of information is so wide-spread thanks to technology.

For me, digital technology is wonderful, but not the be-all-and-end-all.  It has its downsides, things I don’t like about it.  I am aware that I stare at the screen whereas I don’t force my eyes when reading a book.  I change my posture lots when reading a physical book, but find myself hunched in one position not having moved for ages when looking at the computer screen.  I now ensure that I switch the computer off for large chunks of my day, and I limit myself to a certain length of time on the computer at a sitting.  Writing this blog and reading the 4 articles have taken up the best part of a morning.  A useful exercise for me, and therefore not time wasted, but I could have been weaving……

Ultimately, the proof of the pudding is in the weaving, and nothing is more effective than sampling to check that not only the weave structure but also the yarns behave in the way that you intend.  Although I am using a table loom for this warp, the work I will develop from it will be woven on a computer-assisted floor loom – a perfect marriage of technology and hand!

Happy Weaving!

20 July, 2014

Ruminations

I must admit to being a little shell-shocked with the past 7 months’ activities.  It has been a total whirlwind of travelling, teaching, experiencing new places and people and now I have landed back on planet reality!

But time to reflect before plunging into the next phase.

January – completing my masters degree and finding out I had been awarded a distinction!  What can I say? Three years of focused learning/investigations into weaving, art history, philosophy, materials, writing essays and fine-tuning things, but most of all, learning about how I think, how others think things through, what art can mean, abstracting ideas and honing in on specifics and details in order to create something that means many different things to different people.  I knew when I began the MA that I would learn so much and develop as a person and an artist, but I have truly discovered so much more through this process than I could possibly have imagined.  I would encourage you, if it is something you have considered doing, take the plunge.

February – immersed in finalising details for workshops in New Zealand, February swooshed by.  Packing my exhibition and teaching materials into two suitcases, as well as a few clothes for a two month visit, took a fair bit of trial and error, and eventual sitting on the suitcases to squeeze out enough air to close the zips!

March – arriving in New Zealand and hitting the ground running.  Agnes didn’t give me time to breathe, which was probably a good thing!  Straight into the Professional Weavers Network Conference at Coopers Beach, North Island.  Stunning area of natural beauty.  The first leg of our joint exhibition Nature in the Making at the Earth House, Peria. A huge thank you to Dhaj Sumner, amazing lady and so warm-hearted, who created the Earth House in the first place, and gave us such a welcome!  Great reception of our work – it looks like it was made to live here!  Continuing preparations for the start of the teaching tour, although a little time to visit a couple of places for geology and relaxation.  Then on tour.  A series of workshops travelling from North to South, from Oruru, through Whangerei, Auckland, Hamilton,  Wellington, meeting lots of new people, lovely weavers, stunning scenery and warm welcomes from generous hosts. including an unexpected holiday in Wellington thanks to Robyn and Dave Parker.

April – over the straits to South Island.  Workshops in Blenheim, Canterbury, Timaru and Dunedin meeting felters as well as weavers and making new friends all the way.  A short break and chill time in Nelson, thanks to Sue and Tom Broad.  Setting up for the second of our exhibitions in New Zealand at Arts in Oxford, near to Christchurch.  Delighted with the gallery – lovely space and warm people.  Special thanks to Rachel McRobb, the gallery manager, and the volunteers, especially Celia for her generosity in sharing her love of local pigments! The work looks amazing in this fine-art gallery space! And thanks to our hosts here, Wilson and George! And in Timaru, lovely Mary and Gary Anderson. Then after the Creative Fibres Forum Festival at Dunedin, a holiday incorporating lots of geology and the west coast.  Amazing!  Firsts include seeing albatross, Hector’s Dolphins and 3 Keas.

May – home again and trying hard to absorb all the sights and sounds of New Zealand whilst preparing for the Complex Weavers Seminars in Tacoma.  Learning how to cut and twist paper for weaving, and busily weaving some more samples to enhance my presentation on textural techniques for 4 – 8 shafts, the month zoomed by.

June – completing preparations for Tacoma, and wondering how I managed to fit all my samples and my exhibition into my suitcases as the samples now seem to be taking up most of my luggage allowance!  Then off to the Pacific NorthWest to hang our exhibition in B2 Fine Art Gallery, visit Seattle to see the Chihuly Museum, and travel some of the west coast of Washington State and pop down to Oregon before the whirlwind that is Complex Weavers Seminars.  A huge thank you to Gary and Deborah Boone, owners of B2 Fine Art Gallery, and wonderful people, for their support and generosity!  Not only did we have an opening ‘do’, but also an artists’ reception and then a very special ‘Nightcap’ dessert reception during Complex Weavers Seminars when the gallery opened especially for the weavers to visit!  Then Complex Weavers Seminars!  Exhausting, exhilarating, and exuberant!  With minds fully overloaded from inspiring teaching seminars, and friendships renewed, new ones made, and amazing sunsets appreciated, it was time to depart.

July – an awe-inspiring trip to Mt Rainier started an incredible two weeks of travelling in Washington and Oregon, visiting geological highlights of Oregon’s coast, mountains, high prairies and river gorges, with huge thanks to Barb and Steve Walker for their hospitality!  Big thanks, too, to Suzie Liles, as our exhibition will travel from Tacoma to Eugene Textile Centre for its next showing from 1st August to 11th October!

So now…..  getting my head around these amazing 7 months; writing up my notes from the US trip and writing down all those weaving ideas that the inspiring countryside and geology have given rise to, then prioritizing those ideas into things I can instigate immediately, and those that will have to wait a while; preparing for an intensive month of teaching; and also researching possible venues for our exhibition here in the UK.  On that last note, if anyone has any suggestions for galleries or museums that might be interested in our work in any country, please don’t hesitate to email me:  stacey@theloomroom.co.uk  and I will follow up!

Who knows – I might even start blogging regularly again!! :^))  Thanks for bearing with me over the last 3 years!

And Happy Weaving!!

 

 

10 July, 2014

The Gem of The Jewel

Filed under: Art,Education,Life,Nature,Travel — admin @ 1:20 am

It’s not often that I press my nose against the window of a jewellery store and really drool (aural alliteration intended!)  but today, in Sisters, Oregon, we discovered a treasure!  The window display lured us in and pure seduction awaited us!  For rock junkies, the lure was fossilised dendrite slate, stunning lab0radite, agates in rock form, jasper, amethyst, petrified wood, fossils, and the list goes on…..  And in addition to these beautiful rocks, set out on other rocks were stunning jewellery which were inspired by the rocks they rested on.

I have never seen such an attractive display of jewellery in my life!  The owner of The Jewel, a jewelry arts gallery, was brought up surrounded by rocks in a mining family (hope I got that right!) and obviously absorbed the inner structure and beauty of the rocks in her DNA because the work is so attuned to the natural forms.  Peggy, the general manager, was on hand to give some background information and to admit that she has THE best job in the world set in a stunning geologically marvellous place (Sisters is in the geologically active Cascade Mountain range on the edge of Central Oregon surrounded by volcanic mountains which are skiers paradise in winter and the exposed lava fields and flows attract many summer visitors).  I can quite see why!!  All the staff were really enthused with the work and we left with Agnes having succumbed to a stunning piece of laboradite.  Unfortunately (fortunately for DH!!) I already have my full luggage weight allowance and couldn’t indulge!!  :^((

But I give advance warning that if I ever am so fortunate as to come to this part of the US again, and Oregon in particular, wild horses would not stop me from paying another visit and buying a gem of a rock to accompany me home.  If you are in the area, I would suggest it as one of the top places to visit if you like beauty/natural beauty/jewelry.  Inthe meantime, I will just have to make do with the inspiration gleaned from the stunning examples of geology in rock form, and the memory of beautiful wearable rock art in the form of unusual jewellery in a memorable display.

PS  The frozen yoghurt shop just down the road is well worth a visit too!!  Especially on a day where the temperatures have hit in excess of 96F…  :^))

27 June, 2014

South Washington Coast

Filed under: Art,Education,Life,Nature,Travel — admin @ 6:09 pm

After the thrills of Columbia, back up to Tacoma for Complex Weavers Seminars, via the coastline of South Washington.  The collections of driftwood all along this northwest coastline are just amazing – twisted, stripped, elegant, sculpted, things of beauty even after its natural life has been torn away…..  Lots to inspire!

 

Borderlines – Columbia River Gorge

Filed under: Education,Life,Nature,Travel — admin @ 5:56 pm

Boundaries and borders are featuring a lot in my life at the moment – in weaving and in travel.  It’s an area that never ceases to amaze and inspire me, and Columbia River Gorge, the boundary between Washington and Oregon, is no exception!  A lovely day spent with views galore, moody skies, waterfalls, rocks (again!) and lovely bridges.  Historic Route 30, running adjacent to the busy Highway 84, is a haven of peace and quiet (except at Multnomah Falls!) and we took all day to travel the 6 – 7 miles taking in the sights and sounds of nature with a hum of manmade traffic in the background!

This time, the mountain in our sights was Mt Hood!

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